Mosasaur Tooth with Otodus obliquus in Matrix
Mosasaur Tooth with Otodus obliquus in Matrix
Mosasaur Tooth with Otodus obliquus in Matrix
Mosasaur Tooth with Otodus obliquus in Matrix
Mosasaur Tooth with Otodus obliquus in Matrix
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Mosasaur Tooth with Otodus obliquus in Matrix

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Fantastic specimen for any collector! Mosasaur tooth approx: 1.75" long 1" wide.
Otodus obliquus approx: .75" x .75" Matrix approx 3.25" x 3"
 
About 80 million years ago, there were large creatures that lived in the ocean called Mosasaurs. These "marine lizards" were powerful swimmers; air-breathing predators that once dominated the seas. Mosasaurs are considered one of the Great Marine Reptiles that ruled the oceans during the Cretaceous period. Luckily for us, all Great Marine Reptiles became extinct at the end of the Cretaceous period 65 million years ago. Mosasaurs had huge, double-hinged jaws that enabled them to swallow their prey almost whole, in a snake-like fashion. 

Kem Kem Fossil Beds - Morocco

Otodus is an extinct genus of mackerel shark which lived from the Paleocene to the Miocene epoch. The name Otodus comes from Ancient Greek ὠτ and ὀδούς – thus, "ear-shaped tooth". Wiki

Ototodus' greatest claim to fame is that it seems to have been directly ancestral to Megalodon, the 50-foot-long, 50-ton predatory behemoth that ruled the world's oceans right until the cusp of the modern era. (This is not to diminish Otodus' own place in the record books; this prehistoric shark was at least one and one-half times as big as the biggest Great White Sharks alive today.) Paleontologists have established this evolutionary link by examining the similarities between these two sharks' teeth; specifically, the teeth of Otodus show early hints of the flesh-ripping serrations that would later characterize the teeth of Megalodon.