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Huge Priscacara serrata and Mioplosus labracoides | Green River Formation | Wyoming

Original price $6,000.00 - Original price $6,000.00
Original price
$6,000.00
$6,000.00 - $6,000.00
Current price $6,000.00
Priscacara serrata and Mioplosus labracoides
Eocene (51.98 Million Years Ago)
Private Quarry, Green River Formation, Wyoming, USA
Obtained from the collection of Dr. William Rieger

 

Priscacara approx. size: 12.5"

Mioplosus approx. size: 9"

Plate approx. size: 19" x 13.5"

 

**Due to the size of this specimen, it will be shipped in an internationally compliant wooden crate.
 
Please contact us for a specific shipping rate. You may opt in for in-store pickup to cut your shipping costs all together and pick up your specimen in person. You can pick up from our store location in Kemmerer, Wyoming, or we deliver to both the Denver Gem & Mineral show in the Fall and the Tucson Gem & Mineral show in the winter. For any questions, please don't hesitate to contact us directly.

 

Order Perciformes

Family Moronidae - C. liops, P. serrata, H. hypsacantha, and undescribed Priscacara & Hypsiprisca species

P. serrata is perhaps the most popular and sought after of the Green River Formation fish fossils. The Moronidae are a family of perciform fishes, commonly called the temperate basses. P. serrata is an uncommon find compared to Cockerellites liops, which are often confused without proper examination and preparation. P. serrata are typically larger than C. liops. The best preserved fossils are extracted from the famous "18-inch Layer" on either very sunny days or at night under halogen lights. The reason for this is because a fine layer of limestone shale covers the fossils, and we need to see protruding backbones cast a shadow in order to find the fossils

 

 

Order Perciformes

  • Family Latidae - M. labracoides

M. labracoides specimens:

  • are characterized by 2 dorsal fins and a forked tail
  • known to reach 20 inches
  • juveniles commonly found in mass mortalities and adults found alone, indicating M. labracoides traveled in schools as a juvenile and became solitary as an adult
  • juvenile and adult specimens often found preserved with smaller fish in the jaw or stomach